Tag Archives: pot roast

Easy Slow Cooker Venison Pot Roast

At the end of deer season, we had a friend text us early in the morning: “Could you use any venison? We got an extra deer and don’t have space for it all!”

What followed was a somewhat humorous scramble to say yes to the deer meat. Moving around stuff in the freezer, looking  up YouTube videos on how to process venison, staying up til 2 am trying to make cuts out of a quartered deer… you get the idea. Complete novices working hard to save meat without a clue what we were doing.

However, we ended up with a freezer full of some of the best meat you can get– free range, organic, pesticide free– you name it, this was healthy, wild meat to feed our family.

An easy "set it and forget it" venison recipe.

Enter the pot roast recipe. We actually used the deer neck for our roast, based on an internet recommendation. (Do let me know if there’s other parts suitable for a good roast!)

The nice part is that this is a “set it and forget it” type recipe- just dump the ingredients into your slow cooker unceremoniously and leave it for several hours. You’ll have magic when you get back.

Easy Slow Cooker Venison Pot Roast

  • 1 large bone-in venison neck roast
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, diced
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • Salt & pepper (enough to generously rub the surface of the meat.)
  • 2 cups water

This is SO easy. Just put all the ingredients in the crock pot, rub the Venison with salt & pepper, and cover with water. Put a lid on it and cook on high for about 4 hours.

Done!

I served mine with oven-roasted potatoes & buttered carrots and peas. I’m sure you could easily put vegetables in the crock pot with the meat if you prefer a one-pot meal.

Another great part about this meal is that it makes its own broth. After we ate our pot roast, I made venison stew the next night with the leftover meat and broth. It was absolutely delicious.

If you’ve never tried venison before, this is a great way to begin! It tastes very similar to a beef pot roast. The meat is soft and falls apart under the fork. No tough, dry venison stereotype here!

We hope you enjoy it just as much as we did. 🙂