Tag Archives: herbal tea

Herbal Teas to Grow or Forage Yourself

Most of us are familiar with vegetable gardens and herb gardens- but what about your own tea garden?

Delicious herbal teas that you can grow or forage!

(Catnip tea brewing in our Tea Posy pot.)

I love a good black tea in the afternoon, but herbal teas are my friends for various health benefits. I have paid premium prices for a small bit of tea ($9 for 15 tea bags?!?)- and would continue to buy said tea if it was something we couldn’t easily access at home- but there are so many home-grown and wild options to try first!


You can either plant a specific area as a tea garden, or you can simply look around your yard to forage for flowers, plants, herbs, and weeds that can easily be turned into teas.

As always, make sure you double and triple check the identification of any wild plant you find before consuming it, and consider consulting with a local foraging expert. It’s also not a bad idea to try a new plant in small amounts to see how you tolerate it before overdoing it.

Here’s my list to get you started- though it will likely continue growing. 😉 (This post contains some affiliate links.)

Online Herbalism Courses for all levels

  1. Mint– Prolific, easy to grow, hard to take out of the ground. Make sure it’s where you want it. 😉 Here’s some inspiration for various mint tea recipes, and here’s some info on the health benefits of peppermint.
  2. Lemon Balm– This iced tea recipe is good for anxiety, wounds, and sleep disorders. You could also try this recipe for lemon balm-green tea and learn about why lemon balm is just a great plant to cultivate in your yard. Plus, it tastes and smells good. (It’s also a member of the mint family.)
  3. Chamomile – This flower makes a relaxing tea that is also renowned for many health benefits.
  4. Plantain– Known as a medicinal plant used for many purposes (treating insect bites and stings being one of them), it can also be made into a tea for when you’re feeling ill.
  5. Stinging Nettle– I first tried dried nettle tea from a local bulk tea and spice boutique. I had a light bulb moment when my husband suggested drying the stuff in our yard (or boiling fresh leaves) instead of continuing to buy it!
  6. Dandelion Root– I actually haven’t tried making this one at home yet, but I’ve got some dried dandelion roots sitting under my spice cabinet, waiting to be tasted. I’ll have to give these instructions a whirl.
  7. Red Raspberry Leaf– This tea is famous for uterine health. I’ve been enjoying a daily cup of homemade “Mama-to-be-tea” from a local boutique that features raspberry leaf.
  8. Carrot Greens– This is one that you’ll have to do your own research on. Some say that carrot greens are toxic, others say that they’re a market vegetable in many countries. This article pulls in favor of consuming carrot tops, and references several other discussions on the topic. I won’t tell you that you should consume carrot greens. I’ll just say that we’ve made iced tea out of fresh carrot greens several times and haven’t died (or gotten sick) yet.
  9. Echinacea– I didn’t realize for a long time that those gorgeous summer purple cone flowers are actually echinacea! Known for immunity benefits, echinacea is easy to harvest and prepare for tea.
  10. Basil– Apparently, this tasty herb works well for sore throats, headaches, and upset stomachs! I didn’t know that before reading this!
  11. Wintergreen– Here’s the secret to enjoying foraged wintergreen tea that’s full of flavor.
  12. Catnip– We drank catnip tea all winter long to help get over colds faster. Between that, homemade stock, elderberry syrup, and raw honey, none of us stayed sick more than a couple of days. Here’s how to identify catnip.
  13. Red Clover– This medicinal plant grows wild all over the place! Just look down!
  14. Drink your fruitsThis post covers instructions for blackberry, raspberry, strawberry leaf, elderflower, and orange peel teas. How exciting is that?
  15. Winter teasThis blogger details how to make teas out of four forage-able wild winter plants. How cool! (No pun intended.) Who says you have to grow and dry tea in the summer months?

Stinging Nettle- perfect to harvest for herbal tea!

A patch of stinging nettle- perfect for brewing a cup of tea!

You can also check out Herbal Academy’s post on homemade tea recipes for cold and flu season. Gather and dry your ingredients now, then mix and use them all winter!

(If you live in a warm area, you can grow regular “black tea” as well. Our northeastern area isn’t well suited to this warm weather plant, so that’s one tea I’ll keep buying.)

To enjoy your teas fresh, simply pour boiling water over the herbs. (It helps to have a tea ball of some sort to contain them.) You’ll learn over time to adjust the amount and steeping time to your liking. If you prefer to dry them first, you can hang them up, use a dehydrator (I have and love this one), or look up instructions for drying individual herbs in your oven. Then store and use as you would dried tea throughout the year.

What’s your favorite herbal tea?

Learn how to grow or forage for these delicious herbal teas!

How to Make Catnip Tea

Tis the season… we were finally been hit with our first straight up cold. I was writing this post with blocked ears, a foggy feeling head, achy muscles, and maybe a low-grade fever. (Do forgive me if you find typos.) The cold was not a major illness by any means, but I do like to try to feel better when I can. One of our favorite ways to support our bodies through the common cold is by drinking catnip tea.

How to Make Catnip Tea

I’m not a doctor or an herbalist. I’m just an amateur who likes looking up information on plants. The following post is for informational purposes only, and is not for medical purposes. This post contains affiliate links


Catnip looks and grows like a member of the mint family, with square stems and leaves with a serrated edge. It also puts off lovely pale flowers (as seen in this photo) that can be almost overpoweringly fragrant when in bloom.

While catnip is known to make felines crazy, it actually has a calming effect on people. It’s most commonly known for its sedative properties, and is used to help with insomnia, anxiety, headaches, cold, flu, and stomach upset. It’s also sometimes used to help bring on menstruation.

As with most herbs and supplements, there are some precautions that should be taken with catnip. Click here for more information. Catnip isn’t meant to cure, treat, or prevent any disease, but it does have a long history as a traditional herb in many cultures.

Ready to make tea?

If you have catnip in your yard or your tea garden, you’re in luck- harvesting and drying is simple. Cut the plant at the base of the stem and either hang it to dry over a couple weeks, or follow the guidelines for your dehydrator. Break the leaves off of the stem and either grind or run through a food processor to turn it into tiny tea leaves. Next, store the leaves in a mason jar in a dry place. They should last you all winter. Catnip tea can also be made from fresh leaves.

If you don’t easily have access to catnip, the most economical option is to purchase it in bulk. You can get catnip from Mountain Rose Herbs here.

catnip

(Image from Mountain Rose Herbs, used with permission)

For hot tea, brew- 1-2 tsp of dried catnip per 8 oz of water for about 10 minutes. We like to enjoy it with a scoop of raw honey!

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