Five Ways to Cook Without Power

We had a pretty wild snowstorm last week– we got about 2.5 feet of snow dumped on us at once, everything shut down, and our county was in a state of emergency with a travel ban due to avalanches on nearby roads.

Thankfully, our power did NOT go out. But it made me think about whether or not we would have been prepared if it had. With no ability to leave the house, an outage would have made things a bit complicated!

Candles & oil lamp- check. Water bottles- check. Shelf-stable food- check. Extra blankets and layers of clothing- check. Shelter- check. And, happily for us, we also had the ability to cook without power if needed.

When the power goes out and you can't get anywhere, what would you eat?

Almost four years ago, my husband built us a beautiful mud oven in our back yard. (You can read the post on that process here.)  It was made with mostly found materials and runs on small logs and manpower. It’s delightful to use for cooking any day of the week, but it would be especially useful during a power outage.

Of course, power outages don’t only happen in winter, and there are other reasons to use alternative cooking methods besides an outage. Saving money on bills, reducing heat in the house in the summer, or just enjoying the charm of cooking outdoors- cooking without power is a skill for all occasions.

Thus, I present to you: cooking options that don’t involve electricity. (This post contains affiliate links.)

  1. Open Fire Cooking

Sounds obvious, right? However, I’m often ashamed of how long it takes me to start a fire, and I know I’m probably not alone in my challenges. Here are some posts with tips on cooking over an open fire:

2. Solar Ovens

Solar ovens are what they sound like: cooking with no fuel but the sun! Now that’s cheap power! I have never tried a solar oven, but they are apparently a popular off-grid cooking option. Here are several posts with more information & solar oven recipes:

3. Dutch Ovens

Obviously, a dutch oven can be used indoors in a conventional oven. However, its durability lends itself to alternative cooking methods very well. If you’ve managed to find yourself a good cast iron dutch oven, be happy. You can do a lot with it! Here are a few examples:

4. Alternative Stoves

Who says you need a nice cook top to saute something? Check out these posts for some alternatives to the conventional range.

5. Earth & Brick Ovens

Jas Townsend– one of our original mud oven inspirations:

Other Inspiring Posts

What other ways have you cooked without electricity? Share below in the comments!

Be prepared for your next outage, camping trip, or just for a bit of fun cooking the old-fashioned way.

 

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